Chancellor of Maryland Alexander Hanson writes to Brig Gen John Kilty "they will not quietly submit to direct taxation"

Recipient

Date Written

Sept. 7, 1796

Alexander Contee Hanson, Sr. was 46 years old when this was written.
The recipient, John Kilty, was 40 when it was received.

Alexander Contee Hanson, Sr. died 9 years, 4 months, 9 days after writing this.
It was written 223 years, 2 months, 10 days ago.
It was a Wednesday.

Dear Sir,

I have perused the paper which you did the honor of putting it into my hands, and if I possessed any documents which might assist you to give satisfactory answers to some of the Secretary’s enquiries, I would most cheerfully furnish them.

The truth is for at least the last seven years, I have paid little attention to the subject of those enquiries, and, of course, I know little about them. Excepting the laws passed by our general assembly, I am perhaps less acquainted with the proceedings in either house during that term than any other free citizen of Annapolis.

It appears to me, that very little positive information is to be given. However the present state agent has made the subjects of the queries his peculiar study, and I doubt he is able at once to give as perfect an account as may be obtained of everything except the proper objects, as they are called, of taxation and their amounts and quantities. Mr. Callahan, I conceive, can inform you pretty nearly of the number of acres of arable land.

I am afraid that to answer the queries in the manner, which seems expected by the Secretary—to give, in addition to more facts, your own opinions, or conjectures, or the opinions objections, etc., of others might be invidious to your fellow citizens.

I am really alarmed at the idea of the probable consequences of an adoption of the plan in contemplation. The general government must be supported, the ability of the people cannot be denied; but they will not quietly submit to direct taxation.

I am sorry that this letter is to give so little information, and am, dear sir, with great esteem and respect, Your obedient servant.

A. C. Hanson

Annapolis

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